DHR Acquires 1 Million Shares of Canadian Recruiting Rival

July 1, 2015 – DHR International has confirmed that it purchased an aggregate of 1,032,00 shares of Canadian rival Caldwell Partners International last week on the open market of the Toronto Stock Exchange. The share purchase represents approximately five percent of Caldwell’s issued and outstanding common shares. DHR said in a call this evening that it believes it is now Caldwell Partners’ third largest shareholder.

In recent weeks, Chicago-based DHR has been in communication with Caldwell’s management regarding a possible acquisition of the company. DHR said that it expects that any negotiated transaction would be priced at “a premium to the recent market price of Caldwell’s common shares,” and that DHR would not require any external financing to complete a full share purchase of the company. To date, no agreement has been reached. According to DHR, it intends to continue exploring its interest in a negotiated transaction with Caldwell and that process is expected to last “at least another couple of weeks” as both companies take time to explore their options.  

DHR is owned by family-office/private equity firm Osprey Capital LLC. The holding company is said to have $1 billion is assets under management. DHR is the sixth largest, privately-held U.S. search firm. 

Contributed by Scott A. Scanlon, Editor-in-Chief, Hunt Scanlon Media

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14 Comments on "DHR Acquires 1 Million Shares of Canadian Recruiting Rival"

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Anonymous
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Nothing in the old paradigm of how business gets done. Everything in the new economy because market domination as a strategy is being disrupted by startups, ethical companies and a totally different kind of economy. Client satisfaction rules. If DHR International can beat client satisfaction ratings of 91% or over and it’s attracting the top talent from these ‘poorly run’ companies, then it’s positioning itself well. If the assumption is market domination ensures survival then short term gains provide no assurance of staying competitive. Heads up! Read any one of a number of articles out on Strategy and Leadership or… Read more »
Anonymous
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DHR is simply taking advantage of two poorly run public companies. What in the world is wrong with that?

Anonymous
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The conditions for survival are different in the creative economy. The fittest offer high quality service to the clients, contribute to the health and well-being of the entire economic and social ecosystem. If this is the best American companies like DHR can do in the creative economy, and if it’s the only way America knows how to do business, then the American economy loses along with the communities and companies being ‘served’. Ethics will ultimately win out over survival at any cost.

Anonymous
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If DHR has the financial ability to acquire a rival then they should do it. It’s called survival of the fittest. I’m a big fan of that. It’s the ultimate American way.

Anonymous
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Hilarious, The Dallas Partners in Caldwell own more shares than DHR…. Seriously , get real … Chump change.,,, can’t wait to see what they do next…. Somebody tell Hoffman to put big boy panties on..,,

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